Food Service Issues Become Public Ones

March 5, 2009

I just returned from a private stakeholder meeting at City Hall today, regarding the potential revisal of city liquor regulations.  Yes, this is an issue of concern and interest for members of the food and beverage industry, but it also represents policy decisions that will undoubtedly affect the general public.

The nature of this gathering is discussed in greater detail on the main page, so I won’t go into too many specifics.  What I will address is the unfortunate reality that the public (or absent industry pros, for that matter) has no forum with which to A.) be kept abreast of this and other issues and B.) direct questions and comments to other concerned and applicable parties.

There were approximately 40 industry professionals in attendance, all sitting around a large round table or in the audience.  As I watched the discussion unfold, it once again reinforced my belief that a collection of individuals, when given an outlet for their opinions, will seize that opportunity and can have an immense amount of influence when it comes to solving problems that affect their lives, communities and businesses.

This, folks, is a collection of people with similar vested interests coming together to have their voices heard for a common goal.  There simply isn’t enough of this going on in our industry, and I think it’s deplorable that the public has no easily accessible channel with which to be heard on issues that affect them.

But in a world where people have easy access to technology and information in the convenience of their own spaces, there should be an online forum for comments, questions, suggestions regarding this and any industry-related issue.  Social and business networking is the best way to gather information on a topic that is relevant to you.

My suggestion to the city of Vancouver or any other organization or industry would be to create a specific network that caters to the needs and voices of its members.  That’s one of the reasons we started Industry Blender:  Because the Facebook and Myspace models have showed that people need to and will congregate with their peers if given the opportuniy.  We need to be the catalysts for this change.

Social networks make our lives richer and easier and give us the opportunity to have our voices heard.  They make possible meaningful and profitable connections with people we never would have met before.  Their power is immeasurable, and it means you will change the way business is done in the future.  You’re the ones conducting the business, so it is imperative that you be front and centre and totally in control of your own fates.

Gathering physically is very important and can never be replaced, but a virtual network is a room that never gets full.  And it requires no driving or schedule juggling to get there.  We could suggest to City Hall or any other decision making organisation to make available a forum where people can voice their opinions on issues.  The technology and ability to do this is before us, it’s just a matter of organising and stratifying interests.

If the City started a network which allowed restaurant, lounge, bar owners and their patrons to comment on the liquor regulation issue, which people are very passionate about, you can be assured there would be a mob of support and comments.  It’s amazing how all these old and established organisations haven’t caught on to the idea.  No matter.  We’ll work together to educate the business world and show them how things have evolved in the 21st century.  We’ll give our customers and colleagues the opportunity to be collectively heard, and we’ll be on the forefront because of it.

So…what does this mean for us?  It means that the Food, Beverage and Hospitality Industry in Vancouver can be on the forefront of this change which market research shows is going to be in full swing in the next 2-4 years.  We’re a progressive bunch that knows our city and customers, and recognise the need to facilitate this change. 

But change is slow to take place, especially for bohemoth, slow moving companies where it takes much more time for things to get done because they’re reluctant to alter their business models.  But our industry is primed for this transition, and we can get in on the ground floor of this transition.

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